lydamorehouse: (yaoi)
[personal profile] lydamorehouse
As you know, gentle reader, I am attempting to teach myself Japanese. Currently, I've found a method that really seems to be working for me, the Pimsleur method. (I think it works because I am a HEAVILY auditory learner who needs a lot of repetition. There aren't even books that come with these CDs. It's 100% listen and repeat. EXACTLY what I like.) I bought the Pimsleur "Conversational Japanese" after having gotten half way through the library's copy, and then I took out Pimsleur's "Japanese: A Short Course." What's been fun is comparing these two.

My conversational Japanese is all about keeping it simple (and picking up the ladies, but that's another story), so for making chit-chat they taught me this:

Person A: O-genki desu ka? (You okay?)
My response: Genki desu (I'm okay!)

Japanese: A Short Course has the same set up, but uses different words.

Person A: Ikaga desu ka? (How are you?)
My response: Genki desu, okage-sama de (I'm okay, thanks to you.)

ISN'T THAT ADORABLE??  I absolutely love that the polite response to "How are you?" Is "Fine, THANKS TO YOU."  I suppose we have something similar in English in that you can sometimes say, "I'm fine, thanks for asking" and that's generally the same vibe here, but the -sama is a particularly polite honorific and I just find it super kawaii! (cute)

The other odd difference is that on the "Conversational" CD we learned to ask where the train station (eki) is.  On the "Japanese: A Short Course" I'm asking for the street (touri). From this I have surmised that the cool, hep cats take the subway and the dorky, stuffy "a short course" people are stuck walking the streets.... 

You will also note that I am exclusively using Romanji here.  That's because I am a loser and have not committed to learning any Hiragana or Katakana yet (don't even speak to me of Kanji.)  Honestly, this is about goals. My goals for learning Japanese is not to read it or write it.  What I want to do is be able to understand spoken Japanese and maybe be able to formulate a response if spoken to (very secondary goal, although the Pimsleur method is giving me a lot more confidence in that secondary goal.) So, Romanji works for me right now.  I do feel like a loser. Speaking of the cool kids, they all write in Hiragana or whatever.  I can recognize a few syllables, but put them together?  Nope, not yet.


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